Unit Rates Explained with a Free Unit Rate Worksheet

Get the free Unit Rate Worksheet and other resources for teaching & understanding Unit Rates

What is a Unit Rate? (Unit Rate Definition and Examples)

Key Points about Unit Rates

  • Unit rates are a way to compare two different quantities in terms of their ratio, and it is expressed as a fraction with one in the denominator.
  • A rate is a comparison of two quantities that have different units, and a unit rate is a specific type of rate that compares a quantity to one unit of another quantity.
  • Finding unit rates is a simple process that involves dividing the numerator by the denominator, and it is essential for students who want to excel in math and for individuals who want to make informed decisions in their daily lives.

Unit Rates Explained

Unit rates are an essential part of mathematics that finds its application in everyday life. It is a way to compare two different quantities in terms of their ratio, and it is expressed as a fraction with one in the denominator. In simple terms, a unit rate is a rate with a denominator of one. It helps in calculating the cost per unit of an item or the speed of an object.

A rate is a comparison of two quantities that have different units. For example, miles per hour, dollars per pound, and gallons per minute, etc. In math, a rate is a ratio that compares two quantities measured in different units. Unit rates are a specific type of rate that compares a quantity to one unit of another quantity.

Finding unit rates is a simple process that involves dividing the numerator by the denominator. It is a crucial step in solving real-world problems that involve comparing two different quantities. Unit rates can be used to determine the best value for money or to compare the speed of different objects. Understanding unit rates is essential for students who want to excel in math and for individuals who want to make informed decisions in their daily lives.

A Rate is a ratio between two different quantities. A Unit Rate is a ratio between two different quantities where the denominator is equal to 1. One of the most common examples of a Unit Rate is Miles per Hour. We know that Miles per Hour is a Unit Rate because, even though the miles may change in the numerator, the denominator is always equal to one hour. In order to change a Rate into a Unit Rate you have to divide both the numerator and denominator by the number that is in the denominator. This will guarantee that you have a one in the denominator. Your answer for the Unit Rate will be the number that you get after dividing both the numerator and denominator by the number in the denominator.

Common Core Standard: 6.RP.2
Return To: Home, 6th Grade
 
 

How to find Unit Rates

What are Unit Rates?

Unit rates are ratios that compare two quantities where one quantity is equal to one. A unit rate is the rate of change per unit of the denominator. For example, if a car travels 60 miles in 2 hours, its unit rate is 30 miles per hour. In this case, the denominator is time (hours), and the numerator is distance (miles).

Unit rates are commonly used in everyday life. For instance, when shopping, customers can compare prices of different products by looking at their unit rates. The unit rate is the cost per unit of the product, such as dollars per pound, ounces per dollar, or miles per gallon. By comparing unit rates, customers can determine which product is a better value.

Unit rates are also used in solving problems involving proportional relationships. For example, if a recipe calls for 2 cups of flour for every 3 cups of sugar, the unit rate of flour to sugar is 2:3. This means that for every 2 cups of flour, there are 3 cups of sugar. If the recipe calls for 6 cups of sugar, then the amount of flour needed is 4 cups (since 2:3 is equivalent to 4:6).

In addition, unit rates can be used to convert between different units of measurement. For example, if a recipe calls for 2 cups of milk, but you only have a measuring cup that measures in ounces, you can use the unit rate of 1 cup equals 8 ounces to determine that you need 16 ounces of milk.

Overall, unit rates are a useful tool for comparing, solving problems, and converting between different quantities.

 

Unit Rates Definition

A unit rate is a ratio that compares two different units, with the denominator being one. In other words, it is a rate in which the second quantity is always one. For example, if a car travels 60 miles in one hour, then the unit rate is 60 miles per hour. Similarly, if a person earns $1000 in one month, then the unit rate is $1000 per month.

Unit rates are commonly encountered in daily life, and they play an important role in various fields such as mathematics, science, economics, and engineering. They are used to compare different quantities and to make predictions based on those comparisons.

To calculate a unit rate, one needs to divide the quantity of interest by the corresponding unit. For instance, to find the unit rate of a car that travels 60 miles in one hour, one would divide 60 by 1 hour to get 60 miles per hour.

Unit rates are often used to compare prices of different products. For instance, if a person wants to compare the prices of two different brands of cereal, they can look at the unit price, which is the price per unit of weight or volume. By comparing the unit prices of the two brands, one can determine which brand is more cost-effective.

In summary, a unit rate is a ratio that compares two different units with the denominator being one. They are commonly used in various fields and are used to compare different quantities and make predictions based on those comparisons.

 

 

What is a Rate in Math?

A rate is a ratio that compares two different quantities with different units. It is used to describe how one quantity changes with respect to another quantity. For instance, the speed of a car can be expressed as a rate by comparing the distance it travels to the time it takes to travel that distance.

Rates can be expressed in different ways, including fractions, decimals, and percentages. They can also be written using different units, such as miles per hour, liters per minute, or dollars per pound. Unit rates are a special type of rate where the denominator is 1, and they are used to compare the same type of quantity.

For example, if a car travels 60 miles in 1 hour, its speed can be expressed as a rate of 60 miles per hour. This is a unit rate because the denominator is 1 hour. Unit rates are useful for making comparisons between different situations, such as comparing the prices of different items or the speeds of different vehicles.

It is important to understand the concept of rates in math because they are used in many real-world situations, such as calculating distances, speeds, and costs. Being able to calculate and compare rates is a valuable skill that can be applied in a variety of contexts.

 

How to find Unit Rates Solution

How to Find Unit Rates in 5 Easy Steps

Unit rates are a special type of ratio that compares two different quantities measured in different units. To find the unit rate, it is necessary to compare the two separate measurements and express them as a quantity of one. Here are the steps to find the unit rate:

  1. Understand the concept of unit rate: A unit rate is a ratio in which the denominator is 1. It is a special type of ratio that compares two different quantities measured in different units. For example, if a car travels 60 miles in 1 hour, the unit rate is 60 miles per hour.
  2. Identify the quantity and the unit: To find the unit rate, it is necessary to identify the quantity and the unit of measurement. For instance, if a recipe calls for 2 cups of flour to make 12 cookies, the quantity is 2 cups, and the unit is cups.
  3. Determine the denominator: The denominator of the unit rate is always 1. To find the denominator, it is necessary to identify the unit of measurement of the quantity being compared. For example, if the recipe calls for 2 cups of flour to make 12 cookies, the denominator is 1 cookie.
  4. Divide the quantity by the denominator: To find the unit rate, divide the quantity by the denominator. For example, if the recipe calls for 2 cups of flour to make 12 cookies, the unit rate is 2/12 or 1/6 cup of flour per cookie.
  5. Express the unit rate in the desired unit: Sometimes it is necessary to express the unit rate in a different unit of measurement. To do this, it is necessary to convert the unit of measurement using conversion factors. For example, if the unit rate is 1/6 cup of flour per cookie, it can be expressed as 20/3 teaspoons of flour per cookie.

Examples of unit rates include miles per hour, price per pound, and gallons per minute. Unit rates are useful in many real-world situations, such as calculating the cost per item at a grocery store or determining the speed of a moving object. By following these steps, anyone can find the unit rate of any two quantities measured in different units.

 

5 Challenging Unit Rates Problems

/5

Unit Rates Quiz

Click Start to begin the practice quiz!

1 / 5

Jessica was charged 30 dollars for 15 candy bars. What was the price of each candy bar?

2 / 5

Kenny paid 6 dollars for 24 cans of soda. How much did each can of soda cost?

3 / 5

Jazmin ran 4 miles in 50 minutes. How fast did she run each mile?

4 / 5

Malachi solved 16 problems in 20 minutes. How many problems did he solve per minute?

5 / 5

In Chicago, it rained 12 inches in 5 hours. How many inches did it rain per hour?

Your score is

0%

 

Unit Rate Examples in Real Life

When it comes to unit rates, there are several real-world examples that can help students understand the concept better. Here are some common examples of unit rates that can be used to teach unit rates to students.

Speed and Distance

One of the most common examples of unit rates is speed and distance. For instance, when driving a car, the speed is measured in miles per hour (mph) or kilometers per hour (km/h), while the distance is measured in miles or kilometers. By dividing the distance traveled by the time taken to travel that distance, we can calculate the unit rate of speed.

Cost and Price

Another example of unit rates is cost and price. For instance, when shopping at a grocery store, the cost of an item is measured in cents or dollars, while the quantity of the item is measured in pounds or ounces. By dividing the cost of the item by the quantity of the item, we can calculate the unit price.

Problems and Time

Unit rates can also be used to solve real-world problems that involve time. For example, if a student can solve 20 math problems in 30 minutes, then the unit rate of problems solved per minute is 2/3. This can be calculated by dividing the total number of problems by the total time taken.

Ratios and Unit Price

Unit rates can also be used to compare the prices of different items. For example, if a grocery store is having a sale on apples and the price is $0.50 per pound, and another store is selling apples for $1.00 per 2 pounds, we can use unit rates to determine which store is offering a better deal. By calculating the unit price of each store, we can compare the prices and make an informed decision.

In summary, unit rates are an essential mathematical concept that can be applied to a wide range of real-world problems. By understanding the examples of unit rates, students can develop a better understanding of how to calculate unit rates and use them to solve problems.

 

FAQ about Unit Rates in Math

How do we calculate unit rate?

To calculate a unit rate, divide the quantity by the unit of measure. For example, if a car travels 120 miles in 4 hours, the unit rate is 30 miles per hour.

What is the difference between a unit rate and a ratio?

A ratio is a comparison of two quantities, while a unit rate is a ratio in which the second term is 1. For example, if a recipe calls for 2 cups of flour and 1 cup of sugar, the ratio of flour to sugar is 2:1. The unit rate of flour to sugar is 2 cups of flour per 1 cup of sugar.

Can Unit Rates have decimals?

Yes, unit rates can have decimals. For example, if a car travels 75 miles in 2.5 hours, the unit rate is 30 miles per hour, but with decimals.

What are some real-life examples of unit rates?

Real-life examples of unit rates include the price per pound of produce at a grocery store, the cost per minute of a phone plan, and the speed of a car in miles per hour.

How do you calculate unit rate from a graph?

To calculate a unit rate from a graph, find the slope of the line. The slope is the change in the y-coordinate divided by the change in the x-coordinate.

What are some strategies for solving unit rate problems?

Some strategies for solving unit rate problems include identifying the unit of measure, setting up a proportion, and using mental math to simplify the problem.

What are some common mistakes to avoid when working with unit rates?

Common mistakes to avoid when working with unit rates include forgetting to divide the quantity by the unit of measure, using the wrong unit of measure, and confusing unit rates with ratios.

 

Unit Rate Worksheet Video Explanation

Watch our free video on how to solve Unit Rates. This video shows how to solve problems that are on our free Unit P worksheet that you can get by submitting your email above.

Watch the free Unit Rate video on YouTube here: How to find Unit Rates Video

Video Transcript:

This video is about answering the question what is a unit rate. You can get the worksheet used in this video for free by clicking on the link in the description below. A rate is just a ratio between two different quantities. A unit rate is a ratio between two different quantities but the denominator is always equal to one. The most common example of a unit rate is miles per hour that’s because miles per hour already includes a 1 in the denominator. If you’re going 40 miles per hour that per hour means you’re going 40 miles every 1 hour. This is a unit rate because there’s a 1 in the denominator. And thats how you answer what is unit rate?

We’re going to do a quick example of solving a unit rate using this unit rate word problem. This word problem says Jessica was charged thirty dollars for fifteen candy bars what was the price of each candy bar. Your clue that it’s a unit rate is that it says each candy bar. Each candy bar means one candy bar and that one candy bar means that it’s going to be a unit rate because we have, we will have a 1 in the denominator. We can set up our problem so we have 30, 30 for 15 candy bars. 30 dollars divided by 15 candy bars. The way that you can guarantee that your unit rate will have a 1 in the denominator is if you divide the numbers in the numerator and the denominator by the number in the denominator this will ensure that your denominator will have a 1 in it. In the case of this example if we have 15 in the denominator, we’re going to divide both the numerator by 15 and the denominator by 15. Now we can take 30 and divided by 15 and that gives us two dollars. 30 divided by 15 is two dollars and then we have our denominator which is 15 divided by 15 which will equal one and it’s a candy bar dividing both parts of the fraction by the number in the denominator will ensure that we have a one in the denominator and that’s going to make sure that we have a unit rate as a solution. Our solution to our word problem is going to be two dollars for every one candy bar. We can say two dollars per every one candy bar and that’s going to be our solution and our unit rate to this problem. Let’s do a couple practice problems on our unit rates worksheet and answer the questions how do u find unit rate?

So you may be wondering when we are going to answer what is an example of a unit rate? The first question on our unit rate worksheets that we’re going to show you how to find unit rate with says Kenny paid six dollars for 24 cans of soda how much did each can of soda cost?  Our clue in the problem that says that’s telling us what we’re going to solve for is each can of soda that means that each can of soda is going to be in the denominator. This is going to be the part of our unit rate that has to be equal to 1. The six dollars is going to be the part that goes in the numerator. It says Kenny paid six dollars so we’re going to say six dollars for 24 cans of soda. I’m going to say 24 cans of soda. Now we’re going to divide the numerator and the denominator by the number in the denominator. When we do this we’ll divide 24 in the denominator by 24 and we also have to divide 6 in the numerator by 24. Six dollars divided by 24 is going to be 0.25 dollars or this would be like 25 cents and then 24 divided by 24 is for every one can of soda. We know our unit rate now is 25 cents for every one can of soda or we can say 25 cents per one can of soda. Our unit rate for this problem tells us that Kenny paid 25 cents for every one can of soda.

The next problem we’re going to complete on our unit rate worksheet 6th grade says that in Chicago it rained 12 inches in five hours, how many inches did it rain per hour? This rain per hour is going to be our clue that tells us that this has to be equal to 1. It’s going to go in the denominator, hours go in the denominator. 5 hours goes in the denominator and in the numerator, we’re going to say 12 inches. We have 12 inches in the numerator of rain divided by 5 hours. In order to solve this we have to divide both the numerator and the denominator by the number in the denominator. The denominator has a 5 in it so we’re going to divide the denominator by 5 and the numerator by 5. 12 divided by 5 is 2.4 inches over and then five divided by five is one hour. It rained 2.4 inches in Chicago per one hour and that’s a solution to this unit rates problem. This is a great example of how to find a unit rate.

The last problem on our unit rates worksheet that we’re going to complete to show you how to solve unit rates is number six. This problem says Michael cut five yards and made eighty seven dollars and fifty cents how much did he make per yard? Our clue is going to be per yard that means that yards will go in the denominator. To make this a unit rate we have to divide by the number in the denominator which is 5. We also have to use the 5 and divide it into 87.50 which is in the numerator 87.50 divided by 5 is 17.50 and then in the denominator 5 divided by 5 would be every 1 yard. He made 17 and 50 cents per 1 yard or for each yard. Hopefully this video was helpful for teaching you how to find unit rates. You can try all the practice problems and learn how to do unit rate by downloading the free 6th grade unit rate worksheets above.

the thinking cap newsletter logo